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HOW DOES YOUR FOOD CHOICES CAN AFFECT YOUR ORAL HEALTH?

Do you experience sensitivity, tooth decay, pain or discomfort when you bite food? Perhaps it’s time to change your diet. By getting rid of those unhealthy foodstuffs from your diet and visiting the Barrie dentist regularly, you will improve your dental health.
As much as brushing consistently, flossing and rinsing your mouth are important, what you eat can have a significant impact on your oral health. Here’s how your nutrition can affect the state of your teeth and gums.
      1. CONSUMING CALCIUM RICH FOODS
Foods those are rich in calcium work to strengthen your teeth and gums. A good example is a fermented dairy which has been shown by research to reduce the risk of periodontal diseases.
These types of food will contain the bacteria which slow down the growth of germs in the oral cavity.
      2. CRANBERRIES FOR HEALTHY TEETH
Cranberries are great for the teeth because they contain lots of anthocyanins. The growth of pathogens in oral tissues can be prevented by Anthocyanins. In order to protect the users from tooth cavities, the manufacturers are using the cranberry to make the Mouthwashes.
Other foods that contain anthocyanins include blueberries, raspberries, red cabbage and black rice.
3. INDULGE IN SOME GREEN TEA
Teas like green tea contain lots of polyphenols. These will play the main role in fighting with bacteria and pathogens in the mouth.
It also contains fluoride, which is an essential compound to strengthen teeth.
      4. BRUSH AFTER EATING SUGARY FOODS
From your diet, it is not easy to eliminate the sugar completely. Moreover, our body needs a sugar in order to generate the energy to engage with our day to day activities. Compare to natural or organic foods doesn’t have the more impact than that the chemical sweeteners have on our body and the state of gums and teeth.
Whenever you had a food with a lot of sugar you need to brush your teeth. By making a habit of brushing your teeth after sugary foods it will prevent the tooth diseases. Or else these particles trapped in between your teeth and may cause an infection.
      5. FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Making a habit of eating fruits and vegetables on your daily basis can have a positive impact on the health of your teeth and gums.
By increasing the amount of consuming the fruits and vegetables you can get the vitamins. These vitamins are very important for a good oral health.
6. DRINK LOTS OF WATER
By a drinking lot of water not only helps you to get rid of toxins from your body but also freshens breath and prevents bacteria in your mouth.
By increasing the quantity of water on a daily basis, you can able to fight with bad breath and improves digestion of food and even boost your skin healthy.
There are many other ways to boost oral hygiene such as filling decays to prevent the spread of infection to other teeth and visiting the dentist on a regular basis. You may also want to consider cosmetic dentistry to improve your smile.

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